The Enduring Power of Traditional Media

The Enduring Power of Traditional Media

April 2, 2012  |  Articles, Trends in the Marketplace
Despite all the buzz about the declining revenue of print media, the reality is that traditional channels are not being replaced by social channels. According to Paul Greenberg, author of the best-seller CRM at the Speed of Light, traditional channels aren’t given the importance they deserve because they are harder to measure and don’t scale the same way as online channels.
Greenberg cites a recent study by IBM’s Institute for Business Value, which revealed that 70 percent of all the participants in social channels do it strictly for personal reasons, and only 23 percent interact with a company’s brand. In other words, social customers don’t care about a brand as much as they care about communicating with their friends
Greenberg believes that offline, traditional channels still represent a substantial way to influence buying decisions and solve problems, and that smart marketers are those who work with both offline and online media, and who treat social channels as nothing more or less than a new set of communications options for interacting with social customers.
Traditional and social channels for marketing and customer service in particular are just elements in how you can engage customers. Sometimes you need social channels; other times, they are less important. Either way, Greenberg says, “the solution is never the channel itself but how you use it. What you do in it, how you interact, and what problems you solve in a reasonable time frame far outweigh the channel itself.”

Despite all the buzz about the declining revenue of print media, the reality is that traditional channels are not being replaced by social channels. According to Paul Greenberg, author of the best-seller CRM at the Speed of Light, traditional channels aren’t given the importance they deserve because they are harder to measure and don’t scale the same way as online channels.

Greenberg cites a recent study by IBM’s Institute for Business Value, which revealed that 70 percent of all the participants in social channels do it strictly for personal reasons, and only 23 percent interact with a company’s brand. In other words, social customers don’t care about a brand as much as they care about communicating with their friends

Marketers must maintain a good mix of traditional and contemporary media channels in order to fully enhance consumer interaction with their brands.

Greenberg believes that offline, traditional channels still represent a substantial way to influence buying decisions and solve problems, and that smart marketers are those who work with both offline and online media, and who treat social channels as nothing more or less than a new set of communications options for interacting with social customers.

Traditional and social channels for marketing and customer service in particular are just elements in how you can engage customers. Sometimes you need social channels; other times, they are less important. Either way, Greenberg says, “the solution is never the channel itself but how you use it. What you do in it, how you interact, and what problems you solve in a reasonable time frame far outweigh the channel itself.”



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